Step back in time to British Columbia’s cowboy history; the province’s ‘wild west’ is still a landscape of rolling ranchland where cowboys ride the range. Gold was discovered in this region in the 1800s, and evidence of the rush runs throughout the many preserved heritage sites where visitor’s can relive the hey days, and learn about the roots Chinese inhabitants had in the region.

Barkerville Historic Town

Founded in 1862, Barkerville was ”The Gold Capital of British Columbia” & is now the largest historic site in Western North America. Take a step back in history to one of the largest gold rushes in the world.

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Bear’s Paw Café

In addition to providing food that is exceptional in its quality, presentation, and taste, the Bear’s Paw Cafe is also alive with music events, has a great gift item selection, and features an outdoor theme consistent with its setting in

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Clinton Museuum

The red brick schoolhouse that currently houses the Clinton Museum was constructed in 1892 from bricks manufactured at a local plant.

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Cottonwood House Historic Site

Cottonwood House is one of the last remaining roadhouses in BC. A visit to this historic site will allow you to experience the rich history of the Cariboo region first hand.

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Gold Rush Trail

Gold was discovered in the Cariboo in 1859. Three years later, Britain’s Royal Engineers began construction of a historic road to riches.

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Gold Rush Trail Alexandra Bridge

Alexandra Bridge is a steel and concrete suspension bridge spanning the Fraser River adjacent to Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park, 22 kilometres north of Yale in southwestern British Columbia.

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Gold Rush Trail Ashcroft Manor

In 1862 C.F. & H.P. Cornwall settled here and developed Ashcroft Manor. The ranch, with its grist mill and saw mills, supplied Cariboo miners. The manor house was destroyed by fire in 1943, but the road house survives.

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Gold Rush Trail BX

Connecting Barkerville with the outside world, the “BX” stage coaches served “Cariboo” for over 50 years. The terminus was moved from Yale to Ashcroft after CPR construction destroyed the wagon road through the Fraser Canyon.

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Kelly House B&B

Located in the historic site of Barkerville, the only heritage site that allows overnight guests. Step out the door to the 1860’s with restaurants, shops, live theatre, stagecoach & gold panning. Also enjoy hiking, biking, skiing & snowmobiling.

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Quesnel & District Museum & Archives

One of the top community museums in BC, Quesnel Museum and Archives has over 30,415 artifacts and archival items. Through a range of exhibits you’ll experience the trials and triumphs of daily farming, logging and mining life in BC.

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Quesnel Forks

At the end of a winding dirt and gravel road stands the site of the earliest mining camp in the Cariboo.

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St. George Hotel

While in historic Barkerville, why not overnight in the heart of town & have the place to yourselves? The St. George provides visitors with the opportunity to spend the night in the gold rush town, something few visitors experience.

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Station House Studio & Gallery

The Station House Gallery and Gift shop is situated in an original regular #3 Rail Station that was built in 1920. The building still has most of the original features (including framed blueprints).

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Stella Ranch Bale B&B

Stella Ranch Bale B&B is a lovely Lindal cedar home at base of the Marble Mountains. Hike or ride parts of the original Gold Rush Trail.

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Wells Hotel

Restored B&B Heritage Inn established 1933, your Barkerville & Bowron Lakes home base. Major renovations & improvements since 2004, rooftop hot tub, all rooms have baths. Fireplaces, fir & birch wood floors, friendly country pub, licenced restaurant, hearty continental breakfast.

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Xatśūll Heritage Village

The Xatśūll First Nation community welcomes you to their National Award-Winning Heritage Village. The Majestic Fraser River runs alongside the Xatśūll Heritage Village and has played an integral role in the community throughout the years.

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