Craigdarroch Castle

Coal baron Robert Dunsmuir was the wealthiest and most influential man of his time in British Columbia. He died in 1889 leaving his entire estate to his wife Joan who lived in the Castle until her death in 1908.

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Creston & District Museum & Archives

One of the best small museums anywhere. With thousands of artifacts on display, knowledgeable interpreters, model railway and historic buildings on-site, and lovely park-like grounds, the Creston Museum is one place you don’t want to miss.

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Delta Museum & Archives

Step Back in Time at the Delta Museum and Archives! Come explore the 1912 Tudor style heritage building and discover your community’s history at the Delta Museum and Archives.

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Doukhobor Discovery Centre

The Doukhobor Discovery Centre will introduce you to Doukhobor culture and their unique lifestyle as it evolved in the Kootenay region of British Columbia from 1908 to 1938.

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Emily Carr House

We welcome you to explore Emily Carr House, birthplace of one of Canada’s most renowned creative figures. This painstakingly restored Victorian villa is the wellspring for celebrated artist and author Emily Carr.

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Enderby & District Museum & Archives

The Enderby & District Museum Society was established in 1973 to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret the human and natural history of the City of Enderby and surrounding district in the North Okanagan.

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Fort Langley National Historic Site

Experience the fur trade at Fort Langley, first built in 1827 by the Hudson’s Bay Company, 50 years before Vancouver. Explore exhibits in a dozen buildings, including the original 1840s Storehouse.

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Fort St. James – National Historic Site

Costumed interpreters and Canada’s largest collection of original fur-trade buildings combine to allow visitors to immerse themselves in the past at Fort St. James. Established in 1806 as a fur trading post, Fort St.

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Fort St. John North Peace Museum

The Fort St. John North Peace Museum tells the story of the North Peace region from First Nations’ settlements to the oil and gas industries of today. Come learn about the fur trade which gave Fort St.

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Fraser River Discovery Centre

Conveniently located along the boardwalk at Westminster Quay and a block away from the Expo Skytrain line, the Fraser River Discovery Centre is an interpretive centre connecting communities in the discovery and celebration of the past, present and future of

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George Little House

George Little House, built in 1914, is home to community & culture. It is home to Via Rail Station & the Wilp Simgan Carving Studio. The house showcases & retails local art, maps, hosts traditional teas & Sunday Flea Markets.

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Gibsons Telephone Exchange

Imagine a time when all of the telephone calls to and from the Sunshine Coast had to be manually connected inside this small building. Built in 1949, the telephone exchange was the epicenter of coastal communication for many years.

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Gibsons Wharf

The wharf is an integral part of Gibsons’ working harbour and an important link to its historic dependence on water transportation. Once the social hub of the community, the first government wharf was built in 1900-1901 and re-built in 1947.

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Gold Rush Trail Alexandra Bridge

Alexandra Bridge is a steel and concrete suspension bridge spanning the Fraser River adjacent to Alexandra Bridge Provincial Park, 22 kilometres north of Yale in southwestern British Columbia.

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Gold Rush Trail Ashcroft Manor

In 1862 C.F. & H.P. Cornwall settled here and developed Ashcroft Manor. The ranch, with its grist mill and saw mills, supplied Cariboo miners. The manor house was destroyed by fire in 1943, but the road house survives.

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Gold Rush Trail BX

Connecting Barkerville with the outside world, the “BX” stage coaches served “Cariboo” for over 50 years. The terminus was moved from Yale to Ashcroft after CPR construction destroyed the wagon road through the Fraser Canyon.

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Gold Rush Trail Church of St. John the Divine

Constructed around 1863 as a Church of England, the Church of St. John the Divine is a significant reflection of the establishment of British social and religious institutions in colonial British Columbia.

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